SBC vs. SIP Server – What is the difference?

by Alan Percy, Senior Director of Product Marketing at TelcoBridges

The question came early and often during our participation at Astricon 2018 in Orlando.  “What’s the difference between an SBC and a SIP Server like Kamailio or OpenSIPs?”   Reminding us that in our world of telecom jargon, sometimes we need to stop and explain what we are talking about.

Let’s step back for a moment to look at the big picture.  When deploying SIP-based applications like Asterisk or FreeSWITCH, at some point, there is a need to divide the call load amongst multiple servers (physical or virtual).  Possibly because of traffic or simply to hedge bets against outages from a server crash, spreading traffic across multiple physical servers is a wise strategy.  The next challenge is routing incoming traffic from one or more service providers to those SIP applications.  Both SIP servers and SBCs can route traffic based on a range of programmable criteria including: dialed number, originating number, randomly, round-robin, availability and more.

Both SIP Servers and SBCs can also handle some of the interoperability and security services, but this is where the differences start to be more apparent.

So, what is an SBC and how does it differ from a SIP Server like Kamailio or OpenSIPs?

The simplest explanation is – SIP Servers manipulate and route SIP messages, never touching the media path.   However, SBCs broker SIP messages and media, acting as an intermediary between two networks, applying complex manipulations, security and routing rules on both the signaling and media.

SIP Server Functional Architecture

SIP message and media brokering within an SBC is accomplished via a Back-to-Back User Agent (or B2BUA for short), essentially terminating the SIP session on one network and re-initiating a new session on another network.  This can be between a WAN and LAN, between two WANs or two LANs.   The most common use case for SBCs puts them in the DMZ, putting one side on the WAN and the other side on a private (and secure) LAN with SIP applications (Asterisk, FreeSWITCH or other) on the protected LAN.  In this role, the SBC protects and distributes the traffic load across the various SIP applications.

Session Border Controller Functional Architecture

Using a B2BUA is more resource intensive than a simple SIP Server, but this is balanced by the additional functionality and security provided.

Beyond greater control over security policies, SBC’s B2BUA capabilities have other benefits, including:

  • Real Topology Hiding – of both SIP messages and media, ensuring the internal network topology of your network is not exposed to the outside world.
  • DOS and DDOS Protection – Intelligent security that stops DOS attacks in their tracks before they can get into your network.
  • Registration Flood Detection and Protection – preventing “network probing” and attempts to overload Asterisk servers with bogus registration attempts.
  • Media conversion and transcoding
  • Advanced call routing and traffic management capabilities across multiple networks.
  • Multi-application support – distributing and adapting SIP traffic between dissimilar applications from different vendors.

Beyond that, there are many other reasons to use commercial SBCs like FreeSBC for scaling Asterisk and FreeSWITCH implementations:

  • Ease of configuration – with FreeSBC’s easy to use web portal, there are no cryptic script languages to learn!  Most configurations can be completed in a few minutes with a web browser.   Want to see how it’s done?  Take a tour of the web portal and learn how to configure FreeSBC for SIP Trunking on YouTube at:   https://youtu.be/GvfKSw1H6gU
  • Low cost subscription-based pricing that allows “pay as you grow” $1/session/year/server for FreeSBC Pro Edition
  • Carrier-grade – with scaling up to 60,000 sessions per server with 1+1 redundancy for High Availability
  • Platform choices – with versions for bare-metal, VMware, KVM and Amazon AWS
  • 24/7 Technical support availability
  • Regular software updates without having to wade through forum recommendations and Github branches

Understanding the difference between these two important network elements gives network designers the tools to build more efficient and secure solutions.

You can learn more by attending the upcoming webinar “What is an SBC?” at:  https://www2.telcobridges.com/WhatIsAnSBC

Download your free evaluation copy of FreeSBC TODAY at: www.FreeSBC.com

 

CommCon 2018 – The Open-Source Community Comes Together

By Alan Percy, Senior Director of Product Marketing, TelcoBridges

Imagine as your taxi is pulling into the driveway of a conference center and as you get closer, it appears there are badge-wearing conference attendees chasing ducks around the front lawn. The first thought goes through your head is “am I at the right place?”  And the answer is, yes, you are…

A few years ago, I had the fortune to met Dan Jenkins, a young software developer by trade who is deeply engaged in the open-source developer community. Dan and I first met at some of the hack-a-thon events where he was helping contestants build voice and video applications with the APIs he had built for WebRTC. During our first meeting, Dan was like many of the people that participate in hack-a-thons: pretty quiet and very knowledgeable about their craft.

Image my surprise when last year Dan kicked off CommCon, a new conference focused on the open-source developer community. Billed as “a conference done right”, my first thought was “was that the same Dan?” Yes, it is the same Dan!

Back to the ducks. Like many conferences, breaking the ice between attendees and doing some team building is an important part of a successful event. Being held in the English countryside, what better activity to break the ice than lessons on duck herding with a team of border collies. Under the guidance of “Bob the duck whisperer”, a group of the attendees soon learned how to use calls to get the dogs to go left, right, stop and start. In teams of three, we all had an opportunity to work together with the dogs to guide the ducks through a series of posts and back to their pen. Other team-building events gave teams an opportunity to try archery, Segway navigation, falconry and try a bounce in a Zorb.

Like Bob, Dan herded his 50+ attendees through an incredible week of technical learning, workshops, networking and team-building events in a stellar setting. During his opening keynote, Dan challenged the attendees: “Don’t be a Knob” – meaning you should treat others as you would like to be treated.  (A simple rule  –I may get it made into a bumper sticker) With this tight-knit group all under one roof, and many of whom complete with similar solutions, there are plenty of opportunities for friction. I had plenty of opportunities to meet and talk with nearly everyone else – building some great new relationships and share what TelcoBridges had to offer the open-source community.

The week wasn’t all fun and games, there was plenty of time to learn from the other attendees during the technical presentations (which can be viewed here). Three days of jam-packed presentations on two tracks, one focused on VoIP while the other focused on WebRTC. The VoIP track featured presentations on Asterisk, FreeSWITCH, Kamailio, OpenSIPS, Kubernetes and more.

The key take-away from the event is a fresh appreciation for the inter-twined and inter-connected nature of the various network elements needed to build a service provider solution. Call switching from here, media services from there, network diagnostics from somewhere else. All supported on a volunteer basis. It left me wondering – is this the right way to manage a revenue-producing network? Frankly, some simplification and tight technology alignments would help significantly.

Daniel-Constantin Shares Kamailio

I came away from the event better educated, with a host of new contacts and a new appreciation for the open-source community.

Tip of the week: “Come bye” makes the dog go clockwise and “Away” makes the dog go counter-clockwise.  Just don’t forget to stop the dog in-between commands with a “Lie down”.